Table for 9 : Supreme Court Food Traditions & Recipes

Clare Cushman, Table for 9 : Supreme Court Food Traditions & Recipes, Supreme Court Historical Society, 2017

Print - Law Library Stacks: KF8742 .C875 2017

Brand new for your reading leisure!  This delightful book takes you way behind the scenes of the Supreme Court, and spotlights the culinary traditions that have been a part of the institution since its first session in 1790.

From cover to cover readers will be rewarded with recipes, wonderful photos, and stories brimming with history.  The author Clare Cushman, who is the Supreme Court Historical Society's publication director, chronicles a very human side of the Justices.  Admittedly, not all their recipes or dietary habits are exactly appetizing, but there's no accounting for taste.  The First Chief Justice, John Jay (1789-1795), liked oysters for breakfast, and there's a recipe for scrambled eggs and oysters if that's your thing (p.97).  Associate Justice Robert H. Jackson (1941-1954) enjoyed cowslip sandwiches for lunch (p.124).  Who knew?  Now you do.

Many of the Justices brought their lunches to work.  For Samuel A. Alito Jr. (2006-) it's leftovers from home.  Word has it his wife is a wonderful cook.  Benjamin Cardozo (1932-1938) brought a slice of cake every day for lunch, but the other Justices teased him and he stopped bringing it (p.16).

This next one is sure to bring a laugh.  There was a time in the late nineteenth century when oral arguments were heard five days a week from noon to 4:00 p.m.  With no break for lunch, it was not uncommon for one or two of the Justices to leave their seats and slip behind the bench to take a bite.  The audience could not see them, but they could distinctly hear "the rattle of knives and forks."  One day an advocate complained to Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller (1888-1910) that there was no quorum present.  The Chief Justice reassured him: "Although you may not see them...there are two Justices present who can hear the argument, and you may proceed."  After many complaints, a formal lunch break was instituted from 2:00-2:30 p.m. (pp.13-15).

And how about this "A dietitian, Maryan Stevens has been credited with her husband John Paul Stevens' longevity on the bench: he sat from 1975-2010 and was the third-longest serving Justice in history when he retired at age 90" (p.106).  His preferred lunch happens to be a peanut butter and jelly sandwich with the crusts cut off (p.16).

There's an entire chapter on Birthday Traditions, and does that pineapple coconut cake ever look good!  This would be Bill's Birthday Cake by Natalie "Nan" Cornell Rehnquist (pp.54-55).  Another delightful chapter features Justices in the Kitchen.  Thurgood Marshall's (1967-1991) grandmother taught him to cook although he tended not to follow recipes.  Sandra Day O'Connor (1981-2006) loved to cook and entertain.  She worked hard to revive the tradition of the Justices eating lunch together which had waned over the years.

There is so much to appreciate about this book, but you must really see it for yourself to take in its full impact.  Many of the photographs look good enough to eat, while others present the Justices as regular people enjoying the company of good food and friends.  The stories and captions that go along with them make for a wonderful hearty stew.  Bon Appétit!

Submitted by Eric Taylor, Evening Reference Librarian on April 4, 2018

This article appears in the categories: Law Library

Submit an Article

lock