Global Legal Studies Events

Fall 2018

September

  • Tuesday, September 11, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Lubar Commons (room 7200). New Technologies and International Governance Series speaker Rebecca Crootof, Yale Law School, will present "International Cybertorts". Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first served basis. Hosted by Professor BJ Ard. 
  • Thursday, September 13, 2018: Annual Mildred Fish Harnack Lecture and 70th anniversary celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, "Current Challenges and the Future of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights" by Navi Pillay, Former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, 4pm, Alumni Lounge, Pyle Center. Reception to follow. Sponsored by the Human Rights Program, International Division, The Laurie Carlson Progressive Ideas Forum and Global Legal Studies Center. For planning purposes please register at eventbrite.
  • Thursday, September 20, 2018: 4pm-5pm in Elvehjem Museum of Art. Mrinalini Sinha, University of Michigan, will present "The Woman Behind the Abolition of Indian Indentured Labor in the British Empire." Co-sponsored by the Center for Research on Gender and Women, The Center for South Asia, the Harvey Goldberg Center, and the Global Legal Studies Center. 

    Abstract: Kunti, a dalit ("untouchable" caste) woman, became the poster child for the nation-wide movement in India against the abolition of the system of indentured labor in 1917. The system, managed by the colonial government in India, had supplied approximatley 1.3 milion workers from India to plantations overseas in the aftermath of the abolition of Atlantic slavery in the 1830s. This presentation explores how a woman at the very bottom of the caste hierachy in India became the face of an empire-wide change. It will argue that Kunti's role in the movement illustrates how a gendered politics underwrote the construction of the "people" (or the demos) as the subject of a new kind of politics in large colonial India.

  • Thursday, September 27, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Lubar Commons (room 7200). New Technologies and International Governance Series speaker William Burns, American University, will present "The Paris Agreement and Climate Geoengineering Options."
    Paper: "Climate Engineering Under the Paris Agreement: A Legal and Policy Primer"
    Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Hosted by Sumudu Atapattu.
    We regret that this event has been cancelled due to illness.

    Abstract: In recent years, the feckless response of the world community to climate change has led to a steadily growing drumbeat for reserach into, and potential deployment of so-called "climate geoengineering options." While climate geoengineering approaches could potentially help us avoid passing critical climatic thresholds, many of them are also fraught with risk, and could produce winners and losers, emphasizing the need for just, equitable and effective governance architecture.

    Given the central role of the Paris Agreement in international cilmate policymaking, a pertinent question is how climate geoengineering approaches might be governed under the Agreement, if at all. The purpose of this presentation will be to assess the potential role of the Paris Agreement in Governing climate geoengineering research and/or deployment, including their potential role in the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of the Agreement's Parties, as well as other aspects of the Agreement that might guide potential deployment by the Parties, including human rights and sustainable development provisions.

  • Thursday, September 27, 2018: 4-5pm in Lubar Commons (room 7200). "Beyond Policy: The Practical Realities of Russia-Ukraine-U.S. Commerical Transactions and Litigation." Max Chester, Foley & Lardner LLP. Hosted by Kathryn Hendley. Sponsored by Global Legal Studies and the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia.

    Abstract: Commercial entities operating across international borders face a number of legal and cultural hurdles. American companies negotiating with partners in Russia or Ukraine not only need to navigate the laws of those countries, but they are also obliged to follow U.S. commercial law, including the Federal Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Major on-the-ground differences in accepted business practices and commercial transaction represent potential pitfalls for clients working under a dual legal framework. Likewise, businesses in East Europe seek out commercial litigators familiar with U.S. law to protect their interests here. In this talk, Chester discusses the complexities of representing U.S. clients abroad and foreign clients in the U.S., the practicalities of protecting clients' legitimate interests amid systemic corruption, and how the FCPA is being enforced in the current political environment.

October

  • Monday, October 1, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Room 7205. South Asia Legal Studies Working Group. By invitation only. 
  • Tuesday, October 2, 2018: Delegation from Giessen, Germany. Invitation Only. Room 7205. Co-sponsored by the International Division.
  • Thursday, October 11, 2018: 12th Annual South Asia Legal Studies Workshop. Featuring Project Incubator Sessions and Short Paper Sessions. See the workshop webpage for the full program. Sponsored by GLS. 
  • Tuesday, October 16, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Lubar Commons (room 7200). "Rights in an Era of Containment: Europe's Migrant Crisis and the End of Universalism." Human Rights Program Speaker Loren Landau, Wits University. Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first served basis. Hosted by Professors Gay Seidman and Alexandra Huneeus. His presentation is based on the paper: "A Chronotope of Containment Development: Europe's Migrant Crisis and Africa's Reterritorialisation" 

Abstract: This talk explains why rights-based movements shift away from legal tactics. To understand that shift, this talk draws on Armstrong and Vernstein's (2008) multi-institutional approach to social movements. However, the approach proposed here reaches beyond their analysis in two important ways. This paper draws evidence from a specific campaign (the U'wa campaign) as a case study to generate hypotheses with respect to when, how, and why activists resort to institutions other than the state. Secondly, the approach proposed here addresses the changes in social movement targets, as did Armstrong and Bernstein, but it also seeks to explain the relationship between the scale, tactics, and targets of movements."

However, the analysis presented here does not seek to provide a general theory of social movement expansion and tactical change. Rather, it proposes a framework to conceptualize tactics within a multi-institutional political context and seeks to advance our understanding of the ways in which the state and the market provide the resources and opportunities for a certain type of activism, which I call "transnational market activism." Specifically, it advances a hypothesis to answer the following research question: how and why do activists expand their scale transnationally and shift from law-centered tactics to market tactics to target non-state actors? 

  • Thursday, October 25, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Lubar Commons (room 7200), “From Truman to Trump: The United Nations, Positivism and Populism,” Marcella David, Betty T. Ferguson Visiting Professor, Florida State University College of Law. Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first served basis. Hosted by Professor Mark Sidel.

    Lecture Summary

November

  • Monday, November 5, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Room 7205. South Asia Legal Studies Working Group. By invitation only. 
  • Wednesday, November 14, 2018: 5:00pm, Lubar Commons, Screening of documentary "Dear Ambassador" (Querido Embaixador), followed by comments by director, Luiz Fernando Goulart, sponsored by IRIS, LACIS, GLS, HRP, IEW and 70th-anniversary celebration of the UDHR.

December

  • Monday, December 3, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Room 7205. South Asia Legal Studies Working Group. By invitation only. 
  • Wednesday, December 5, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Lubar Commons (room 7200). "From International Law to the Global Market: a Case of Multi-Institutional Transnational Mobilization" with Pablo Rueda-Saiz, UW-Madison Tinker Visiting professor, Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first served basis. Hosted by Professor Alexandra Huneeus. 
  • December 10, 2018: Universal Declaration of Human Rights 70th Anniversary Celebration. 3:00-4:30pm in Lubar Commons (Room 7200). Speaker: Tep Sothy (Cambodian politician and Member of Parliament for Takeo province), followed by an award ceremony for the UDHR Anniversary Essay Competition. (GLS/HRP)

Spring 2019

  • Monday, February 11, 2019: New Technologies and International Governance Series Speaker Jennifer Merchant. Noon Lubar Commons (Room 7200). Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Title TBA. 

  • Thursday, February 21, 2018: 12pm-1pm in Lubar Commons (room 7200). New Technologies and International Governance Series speaker William Burns, American University, will present "The Paris Agreement and Climate Geoengineering Options." Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Hosted by Sumudu Atapattu.
    Paper: "Climate Engineering Under the Paris Agreement: A Legal and Policy Primer"

    Abstract: In recent years, the feckless response of the world community to climate change has led to a steadily growing drumbeat for research into, and potential deployment of so-called "climate geoengineering options." While climate geoengineering approaches could potentially help us avoid passing critical climatic thresholds, many of them are also fraught with risk, and could produce winners and losers, emphasizing the need for just, equitable and effective governance architecture.

    Given the central role of the Paris Agreement in international climate policymaking, a pertinent question is how climate geoengineering approaches might be governed under the Agreement, if at all. The purpose of this presentation will be to assess the potential role of the Paris Agreement in Governing climate geoengineering research and/or deployment, including their potential role in the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of the Agreement's Parties, as well as other aspects of the Agreement that might guide potential deployment by the Parties, including human rights and sustainable development provisions.

  • Friday, April 5, 2019: Annual Wisconsin International Law Journal Symposium. "Lawyers and Lawyering in China and Russia: Common Challenges." Sponsored by WILJ GLS, and the EALSC. More details TBA.
  • Saturday, April 6, 2019: Wisconsin International Law Journal Workshop. More details TBA. 
  • Thursday, April 11, 2019: 4:00-5:00pm, reception to follow. Annual J. Jobe and Marguerite Jacqmin Soffa Lecture: Brigitte Baptiste. More Details TBA. Pyle Center Alumni Lounge. Sponsored by Global Legal Studies, Human Rights Program, and the International Division. (HRP) 

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