808 Advanced Legal Writing, Spring 2011 to Spring 2015

Categories: Legal Writing Municipal and Local Government

Advanced Legal Writing

Course Page for Spring 2013 - Kaiser, Aviva

Preparation of legal documents in connection with a real or simulated legal problem. Emphasis on legal problems involving writing experiences different from those gained in Legal Writing I.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Contract Drafting

Course Page for Fall 2014 - Turner, Andrew

Students will learn the art and craft of transactional drafting in this highly interactive, practice-focused course. Most attorneys work with contracts at some point in their career, and understanding how contracts are negotiated and drafted is critical for both transactional attorneys and commercial litigators. The course will teach students how to address and resolve challenges in business transactions by drafting precise and clear contractual provisions. Students will learn to recognize and understand common contractual provisions, structure an effective and elegant agreement, detect drafting landmines, and appreciate the functions and nuances of boilerplate language. They will practice negotiating and drafting a variety of contract provisions. Grades will be based on assignments, in-class work, and class participation.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Drafting & Working with Statutes

Course Page for Spring 2015 - Kreye, Joseph

Being able to read a statute from the drafter’s perspective—and learning how to use statutory language strategically—is important for any practicing attorney, whether the attorney is litigating an issue in court or lobbying for change on behalf of a client. In this hands-on drafting course, students will write, edit, and revise state statutes using the training that the drafting attorneys for the Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau receive. Students will learn about Wisconsin's bill drafting and legislative process, the function of statutes, and the importance of focusing not only on the intent of statutory language but also on its real-world consequences. The class will examine contemporary legal issues and attempt to craft legislative solutions. Instructor: Joseph Kreye (Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau)

Presenting to a Court

Course Page for Spring 2011 - Nowicki, Peggy

Preparation of legal documents in connection with a real or simulated legal problem. Emphasis on legal problems involving writing experiences different from those gained in Legal Writing I.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Problem Solving

Course Page for Fall 2012 - Kaiser, Aviva

Advanced Legal Writing: Problem Solving: "To a hammer, everything looks like a nail." (Anon.) Lawyers are problem solvers. Reflecting this reality, the MacCrate Report by the American Bar Association placed problem-solving at the very top of the list of the ten fundamental lawyering skills. In fact, every major report or survey about legal education lists problem-solving as a fundamental skill that should be taught in law school. Yet there is little written and very few courses about problem-solving. What is problem-solving? What processes do we use to solve problems? To answer these questions, we will read and evaluate some of the new problem-solving literature. We will create a lawyer’s guide for problem solving. We will then use that guide to solve a problem. We will draft documents to implement the solution, paying close attention to the relationship between problem-solving and writing.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Reflective Writing

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Kaiser, Aviva

Preparation of legal documents in connection with a real or simulated legal problem. Emphasis on legal problems involving writing experiences different from those gained in Legal Writing I and II.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Writing for Discovery

Course Page for Spring 2011 - Kasieta, Robert

Preparation of legal documents in connection with a real or simulated legal problem. Emphasis on legal problems involving writing experiences different from those gained in Legal Writing I.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Writing for Law Practice

Course Page for Spring 2014 - Weigold, Ursula

Students will write the types of documents that are typical in representing clients in a case: engagement letters, demand letters, pleadings, discovery requests and responses, communications with opposing counsel, mediation statements, motions, affidavits, and trial-level briefs. They will learn how to adapt their tone, format, and substance to a variety of practice settings and audiences. They will refine their research and writing skills through in-class exercises, peer critique, and extensive instructor feedback. Instructor: Ursula Weigold

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor