Research & Scholarship

The Wisconsin Approach

    Faculty Activities and Scholarship

  • Alta Charo's chapter, "Speed vs. Safety in Drug Development," was published in the book, "FDA in the Twenty-First Century" (Lynch and Cohen, eds.), in September.

  • Rachel Grob co-authored (with Mark Schlesinger, Dale Shaller, Steven Martino, Andrew Parker, Melissa Finucane, Jennifer Cerully and Lise Rybowski) “Taking Patients’ Narratives about Clinicians from Anecdote to Science,” which appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine in August.

  • Shubha Ghosh's chapter in the recently published book, "Diversity in Intellectual Property," was mentioned in a book review published in The Hindu, a national newspaper in India: "Shubha Ghosh raises a very esoteric, if important, issue on genetic research undertaken on a small group with Jewish ancestry. A U.S. company — Myriad Genetics — obtained a patent based on such research. While such research on ethnically, racially, or culturally different groups of people may be useful, Ghosh questions the validity of patents granted for the genetic tests conducted on them."

Wisconsin faculty members share a commitment to excellence in research, embracing a wide variety of substantive concerns and methodological approaches. The faculty has long been known for its interest in interdisciplinary work and for its commitment to a law-in-action approach to scholarship.

For Wisconsin scholars, no matter how interesting or elegant the underlying theory, Wisconsin's law-in-action approach challenges them to answer the question: "Why should this matter to people in the real world?" In contrast to legal scholars whose work is theory-based, Wisconsin scholars tend to begin with an observed, real-world problem or phenomenon and then seek to explain it and to put it into a larger theoretical context.

Much of the research undertaken at Wisconsin is devoted to explaining how law and legal institutions work and often to understanding why law and legal institutions might not be working as intended. The Wisconsin faculty contextualizes law, studying it as one of many social processes that may shape behavior. Many faculty members are active in the Law & Society Association, an international organization of scholars who study the interrelation of society and the legal process; indeed, the current Wisconsin faculty includes three LSA past presidents.

The work of the Wisconsin faculty is not geographically bounded. Though a majority study U.S. law, a growing number explore law in less familiar settings and are focusing their research on the workings of law in countries throughout the world.

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