854 Clinical Program, Spring 2011 to Spring 2018

Categories: Law Practice Skills Criminal Law

Consumer Law

Course Page for Fall 2017 - Orr, Sarah

This course is open only to students enrolled in the Consumer Law Clinic, by instructor's consent.

Summer Learning Objectives:

1a. Students will be able to identify, understand, and apply substantive and procedural consumer protection laws including state and federal statutes and regulations.

2a. Students will be able to gather and analyze examine facts, distinguish the legal and non-legal issues, research the issues and prioritize the issues in a verbal report or written memo.

2b. Students will be able to predict (i.e., hypothesize and visualize) how clients will handle various options and how opposing parties will respond to those actions.

2c. Students will be able to evaluate the various options available to clients, estimate the pros and cons, explain these to the client, and recommend a course(s) of action.

3a. Students will be able to create their own personal definition of what it means to be a legal professional, incorporating the rules of professional conduct and their personal values.

4a. Students will be able to competently conduct an initial client interview.

Fall Learning Objectives

1a. Students will be able to identify, understand, and apply substantive and procedural consumer protection laws, including state and federal statutes and regulations.

2a. Students will be able to gather and analyze examine facts, distinguish the legal and non-legal issues, research the issues and prioritize the issues in a verbal report or written memo.

2b. Students will be able to predict (i.e., hypothesize and visualize) how clients will handle various options and how opposing parties will respond to those actions.

2c. Students will be able to evaluate the various options available to clients, estimate the pros and cons, explain these to the client, and recommend a course(s) of action.

3a. Students will be able to develop and refine their own personal definition of what it means to be a legal professional, incorporating the rules of professional conduct and their personal values.

4a. Students will be able to competently and ethically interview and counsel clients.


Formative Assessment:

In classroom discussions and in response to drafts of written assignments I will give feedback regarding the students’ efforts towards achieving the above learning outcomes. (direct assessment)

I will ask clients and opposing counsel about their assessment of the students’ work. (indirect assessment)

Summative Assessment:

At the end of the term, the student will conduct a self-evaluation and I will conduct a review of his or her portfolio of work including written work product, and participation in the work of the clinic and individual progress over time.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Consumer Law Clinic

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Orr, Sarah

Summer Learning Objectives:

1a. Students will be able to identify, understand, and apply substantive and procedural consumer protection laws including state and federal statutes and regulations.

2a. Students will be able to gather and analyze examine facts, distinguish the legal and non-legal issues, research the issues and prioritize the issues in a verbal report or written memo.

2b. Students will be able to predict (i.e., hypothesize and visualize) how clients will handle various options and how opposing parties will respond to those actions.

2c. Students will be able to evaluate the various options available to clients, estimate the pros and cons, explain these to the client, and recommend a course(s) of action.

3a. Students will be able to create their own personal definition of what it means to be a legal professional, incorporating the rules of professional conduct and their personal values.

4a. Students will be able to competently conduct an initial client interview.

Fall Learning Objectives

1a. Students will be able to identify, understand, and apply substantive and procedural consumer protection laws, including state and federal statutes and regulations.

2a. Students will be able to gather and analyze examine facts, distinguish the legal and non-legal issues, research the issues and prioritize the issues in a verbal report or written memo.

2b. Students will be able to predict (i.e., hypothesize and visualize) how clients will handle various options and how opposing parties will respond to those actions.

2c. Students will be able to evaluate the various options available to clients, estimate the pros and cons, explain these to the client, and recommend a course(s) of action.

3a. Students will be able to develop and refine their own personal definition of what it means to be a legal professional, incorporating the rules of professional conduct and their personal values.

4a. Students will be able to competently and ethically interview and counsel clients.


Formative Assessment:

In classroom discussions and in response to drafts of written assignments I will give feedback regarding the students’ efforts towards achieving the above learning outcomes. (direct assessment)

I will ask clients and opposing counsel about their assessment of the students’ work. (indirect assessment)

Summative Assessment:

At the end of the term, the student will conduct a self-evaluation and I will conduct a review of his or her portfolio of work including written work product, and participation in the work of the clinic and individual progress over time.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Corporate Legal Department Externship

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Heymann, Jane

Learning objectives for the Corporate Legal Department Externship course:

To integrate classroom and real-life experiences, allowing students to apply what they have learned in their business law classes to a real-world setting and to better understand the day-to-day work of in-house lawyers.

To see first-hand the type of legal work that companies retain “in house” and what sort of legal work is typically handled by the company’s outside counsel.

To allow students to obtain supervised, direct legal experience in areas handled by in-house lawyers and to obtain feedback on their performance.

To enable students to explore career interests and goals and build professional networks.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Crim. Appeals Project

Course Page for Fall 2017 - Scheiber Jurss, Hannah

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Criminal Appeals Project

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Scheiber Jurss, Hannah

Learning Objectives - This is a class about the Wisconsin criminal appeals process. It is a two semester course. At the end of the first semester, you will know a great deal about the issue-spotting and post-conviction litigation. At the end of the spring semester, you will know a great deal about appellate brief-writing and litigation before the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.

At the end of the academic-year term, you each should understand:
1. How the criminal appeals process is initiated, and the steps that must be taken to identify issues, develop and litigate post-conviction claims, and write appellate briefs.
2. How to conduct an initial in-person interview with real clients.
3. How to digest the court record, trial attorney file, courts record and transcripts into a comprehensive chronological document.
4. How to identify possible issues for appeal.
5. How to solicit ideas from your client regarding the appeal.
6. How to communicate with your client about the issues that have merit, and the issues that do not have merit and other client questions.
7. How to communicate with the trial attorney, including soliciting ideas for appeal, and raising possible claims of ineffective assistance of counsel.
8. How to draft a post-conviction motion and appellate brief.

Defense Project

Department of Justice

Course Page for Spring 2016 - Gendreau, Chad , Peacock, Ann

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Disability Rights Wisconsin

Course Page for Spring 2016 - Kerschensteiner, Kristin

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Disability Rights Wisconsin Externship

Course Page for Fall 2015 - Kerschensteiner, Kristin

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Domestic Violence

Course Page for Spring 2016 - Meuer, Teresa

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Domestic Violence & Immigration

Course Page for Summer 2012 10-Week Session - Frazier, Rosa

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Domestic Violence & Immigration Clinic

Course Page for Fall 2012 - Frazier, Rosa

DVIC provides humanitarian relief legal services pro bono to victims of violence or persecution. Registration is by permission only after an application process.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Domestic Violence (Externship)

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Meuer, Teresa

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Domestic Violence Externship

Course Page for Fall 2015 - Meuer, Teresa

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Domestic Violence Immigration Clinic

Course Page for Spring 2013 - Frazier, Rosa

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

FCAP: Domestic Violence & Immigration

Course Page for Summer 2011 10-Week Session - Frazier, Rosa

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Family Court Assistance Project (FCAP)

Course Page for Summer 2011 10-Week Session - Mansfield, Marsha

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Family Court Assistance Project (FCAP)/ Family Court Clinic (FCC)

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Mansfield, Marsha

The Family Court Assistance Project (FCAP) is a hands-on experience for law students, designed to address the challenges presented by the great numbers of unrepresented family law litigants flooding the court system. FCAP students provide assistance to these litigants in divorce, post-divorce, paternity, and restraining order matters in Dane County. Students serve as facilitators/mediators, assisting parties through the family court process. Students work at the Dane County Courthouse and at a community office on Madison’s. Students staff these offices during the day and evening hours to meet the needs and schedules of Dane County’s working poor. In addition, students represent individuals in carefully chosen family law cases. FCAP is a full year commitment, beginning each summer and continuing through the academic year. The application process occurs in November.

Family Court Assistance Project (FCAP): Immigration & Domestic Violence

Course Page for Spring 2011 - Frazier, Rosa

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Family Court Assistance Project (FCAP): Restraining Order Clinic

Course Page for Spring 2011 - Mansfield, Marsha

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Family Court Assistance Project (FCAP):Domestic Violence & Immigration Clinic

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Frazier, Rosa

DVIC provides humanitarian relief legal services pro bono to victims of violence or persecution. Registration is by permission only after an application process.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Family Court Clinic

Course Page for Spring 2014 - Mansfield, Marsha

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Family Court Clinic (FCC)

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Mansfield, Marsha

The Family Court Clinic (FCC) is a hands-on experience for law students, designed to address the challenges presented by the great numbers of unrepresented family law litigants flooding the court system. FCC students provide assistance to these litigants in divorce, post-divorce, paternity, and restraining order matters in Dane County. Students serve as facilitators/mediators, assisting parties through the family court process. Students work at the Dane County Courthouse and at a community office on Madison’s south side. Students staff these offices during the day and evening hours to meet the needs and schedules of Dane County’s working poor. In addition, students represent individuals in carefully chosen family law cases. FCC is a full year commitment, beginning each summer and continuing through the academic year. The application process occurs in November.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES – FAMILY COURT CLINIC

1a. Students will be able to identify, understand, and apply substantive and procedural family laws and regulations as well as civil procedure laws as applied in family law cases.

2a. Students will be able to examine a set of facts, distinguish the various legal and non-legal issues, research them, and prioritize the issues in a verbal report or written memo.

2b. Students will be able to predict (i.e. hypothesize and visualize) how various options which clients could take will be handled by the client, and responded to by the opposing party.

2c. Students will be able to evaluate the various options, estimate the pros and cons, explain these, and recommend a course(s) of action that the could be taken.

3a. Students will develop and refine their own personal definition of what it means to be a professional incorporating the rules of professional conduct and their personal values.

4a. Students will be able to competently conduct an initial client interview as well as intake interviews where the students will spot issues and provide litigants with guidance, information and assistance with court forms.

Formative Assessment:

Feedback both in classroom discussions and in response to drafts of written work and assignments.

Client surveys and court feedback regarding their assessment of the students’ work. (indirect assessment)

Summative Assessment:

At the end of the term, the student will conduct a self-evaluation and I will conduct a review of their portfolio of work, i.e. all their written assignments, client work, and measures of skill and personal growth development.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Family Law Project (FLP)

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Shear, Leslie

Learning Outcomes

Students will learn to:
1. Take responsibility for identifying and achieving client goals.
2. Develop proficiency in factual investigation, issue spotting, and legal research and writing, including advocacy and client communication.
3. Learn to collaborate with clients, other students, supervisors, and other actors in the criminal justice system.
4. Recognize ethical issues and resolve or respond to them within the Rules of Professional Responsibility.
5. Begin to engage in self-assessment and reflection about clinical work, the role of the lawyer, and the interaction between families and the criminal justice system.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Federal Appeals Project

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Stevenson, Adam

Throughout the course of the clinic and seminar, students will:
1. Develop proficiency in investigation, issue spotting, legal research and written work, including legal documents and client correspondence
2. Learn to collaborate with clients, other students, and other criminal justice system actors
3. Develop an ability to identify ethical issues in everyday practice, and respond to such issues according to the rules of professional conduct and consistent with norms or professionalism.
4. Learn federal criminal procedure and sentencing, including appellate procedure.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Federal Appeals Project (Oxford Federal Project)

Course Page for Spring 2013 - Stevenson, Adam

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Government & Legislative Clinic

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Noonan, Kathleen

Overview: The Government and Legislative Law Clinic (GLLC) provides students with the unique opportunity to observe and participate in the many facets of governmental law, policy and the legislative process. Working under the direct supervision of clinical faculty and clients in legislative, administrative and judicial settings, students will gain first-hand experience working with government clients on legal issues with policy significance. Clients in the Spring 2011 included the Wisconsin Legislative Research Bureau, Legislative Council, Department of Health and the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. The GLLC requires a minimum commitment of about 16 hours each week, divided between 12 hours with a client (sometimes on site), a 90-minute seminar with all clinic students and weekly one-on-one sessions with clinic faculty. Students accepted into the clinical program typically earn 4 credits but can earn more depending upon their particular client. Participation is limited to second and third-year law students.
Philosophy: GLLC seeks to provide students with hands-on experience with government and legislative clients. The clinic focuses on the development of “policy lawyering” skills, since our client assignments typically do not involve litigation but rather the development of new (or dissolution of existing) laws, regulations and/or policies. The clinic emphasizes several core themes: (1) the work of a government and legislative policy lawyer involves policy choices, which means that there is often not a “right” legal answer but many possible answers based on the criteria most important to your client (e.g., values, efficiency, cost, evidence); (2) the work of a government and legislative policy lawyer requires attention to the interests and needs of multiple constituencies (e.g., voters, agency and legislative leadership; the governor’s office, etc.,) making the question “who is your client” an interesting one to review and revisit; and (3) the work of a government and legislative policy lawyer involves constraints particular to the government context (e.g., elections; open meeting and notice rules; etc., ) which do not exist in more traditional lawyer-client relationships.

Government & Legislative Clinic (GLC)

Course Page for Spring 2018 - McBride, Erin

Clinic Learning Goals:

The Government and Legislative Clinic (GLC) will provide you with a unique, hands-on opportunity to participate in the many facets of governmental law, policy creation and implementation, and the legislative and regulatory process.

Under the direct supervision of clinical faculty and on-site agency staff, you will gain rare, first-hand experience working with law and policy where your client is a legislative body or administrative agency.

Class-component Objectives and Outcomes:

The modern regulatory state touches upon nearly every aspect of our lives, including what we eat and drink, the air we breathe, the products we buy, our healthcare, employer-employee relations, business competition, financial transactions, our national security, criminal law, and much more. This seminar will strengthen your understanding of administrative law and procedures, the legal rules and principles that govern the work of the “regulatory state,” and add background and context to your externship. Throughout the semester, we will examine the legislative lawmaking processes, the implementation of statutes by administrative agencies through rulemaking and other procedures, and the role of courts in interpreting statutes and reviewing administrative action at the behest of affected private parties. In short, this course will examine the processes, purposes, efficacy and limitations of regulation through an administrative regime, rather than criminal enforcement or private law.

The specific weekly goals of the Seminar are:

1.) To introduce the materials, concepts, and tools that lawyers in government, private practice, or with a public interest organization or non-governmental organization need in a world of statutes and regulations; and

2.) To analyze and assess critically the institutions of the administrative regulatory state.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Government & Legislative Law Clinic (GLLC)

Course Page for Spring 2013 - McBride, Erin


The Government and Legislative Law Clinic
(GLLC) provides students with the unique opportunity to observe and participate
in the many facets of governmental law, policy and the legislative process.
Working under the direct supervision of clinical faculty and clients in
legislative, administrative and judicial settings, students will gain
first-hand experience working with government clients on legal issues with
policy significance. Placements currently being considered for the Spring 2010
semester include the Wisconsin Legislative Research Bureau, Legislative Council,
Department of Health and the Department of Children and Families. The GLLC
requires a minimum commitment of 12 hours each week, divided between 10 hours
of work per week at a client site and a two-hour weekly seminar. Students
accepted into the clinical program earn between 3 and 6 credits depending upon
their particular placement. Participation is limited to second and third-year
law students.


 

Govt & Legis Law Clinic (GLLC)

Course Page for Fall 2012 - McBride, Erin

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Govt & Legislative Clinic

Course Page for Fall 2017 - McBride, Erin

Clinic Learning Goals:

The Government and Legislative Clinic (GLC) will provide you with a unique, hands-on opportunity to participate in the many facets of governmental law, policy creation and implementation, and the legislative and regulatory process.

Under the direct supervision of clinical faculty and on-site agency staff, you will gain rare, first-hand experience working with law and policy where your client is a legislative body or administrative agency.

Class-component Objectives and Outcomes:

The modern regulatory state touches upon nearly every aspect of our lives, including what we eat and drink, the air we breathe, the products we buy, our healthcare, employer-employee relations, business competition, financial transactions, our national security, criminal law, and much more. This seminar will strengthen your understanding of administrative law and procedures, the legal rules and principles that govern the work of the “regulatory state,” and add background and context to your externship. Throughout the semester, we will examine the legislative lawmaking processes, the implementation of statutes by administrative agencies through rulemaking and other procedures, and the role of courts in interpreting statutes and reviewing administrative action at the behest of affected private parties. In short, this course will examine the processes, purposes, efficacy and limitations of regulation through an administrative regime, rather than criminal enforcement or private law.

The specific weekly goals of the Seminar are:

1.) To introduce the materials, concepts, and tools that lawyers in government, private practice, or with a public interest organization or non-governmental organization need in a world of statutes and regulations; and

2.) To analyze and assess critically the institutions of the administrative regulatory state.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Hayes Police Prosecution Project

Course Page for Fall 2013 - Kempinen, Ben, Scott, Michael

Summer externship with a police agency and its jurisdiction's prosecutor's office in which the student extern assists the police and prosecutors in improving the community response to a specific crime or disorder problem. Selected students conduct research on the specific problem while enrolled in Selected Problems in Policing seminar during the spring semester.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Immigrant Justice Clinic

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Heeren, Geoff

Immigrant Justice Clinic

Course Learning Outcomes:

• You will competently engage in case management, such as using case management software, file organization, timekeeping, and notetaking.
• You will effectively and sensitively solicit information from clients in interviews and learn to use trauma-informed interviewing skills.
• You will be able to evaluate the various options available to clients, estimate the pros and cons, explain these to the client, and recommend a course of action.
• You will be able to understand and apply substantive immigration law related to removal defense at a basic level.
• You will be able to research complicated questions of immigration law.
• You will demonstrate effective legal writing, such as correspondence, affidavits, motions, and memoranda of law.
• You will demonstrate oral advocacy skills, such as informal advocacy, direct examination, opening and closing statements, and the ability to extemporaneously dialogue with an adjudicator.
• You will engage in strategic planning, such as deciding how to frame a theory of the case, what evidence to pursue and submit, what motions to file, and what witnesses to call to testify.
• You will develop and refine your own definition of what it means to be a legal professional, incorporating the rules of professional conduct and your own values.
• You will collaborate with other students and work through collaboration difficulties.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Innocence Project

Course Page for Spring 2014 - Lichstein, Byron

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Judicial Internship

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Hadjimarkos, Sarah

Goals of the Judicial Internships:
Judicial internships provide students with opportunities to perform legal and factual analysis, research, and writing under the guidance and supervision of law clerks, judges, and justices. The internships also provide rare opportunities to actively participate in the work of the judicial branch and gain a unique perspective as to the judicial decision-making process.

Learning Objectives:
1. Develop proficiency in fact investigation resulting from analysis of trial and appellate records;
2. Improve legal research skills while researching new areas of law;
3. Improve legal writing skills through drafting a variety of assignments, including internal and/or bench memoranda; and
4. Further develop professional skills by (a) developing habits of a reflective practitioner who incorporates feedback and criticism into future work; (b) identifying, exploring, and addressing legal ethics issues in real world context; and (c) building professional networks.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Labor Law

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Clauss, Carin

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Labor Law Clinical

Course Page for Spring 2014 - Clauss, Carin

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Labor Law Externship

Course Page for Spring 2018 - McBride, Erin

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Law & Entrepreneurship

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Smith, Anne

The Law & Entrepreneurship Clinic is a two or three semester transactional course which provides students the opportunity to work with start-up businesses and entrepreneurial clients. Legal issues involve the full diversity of matters confronting nascent entrepreneurs including entity selection, intellectual property issues, contracts, and other legal issues confronting emerging businesses. L&E student attorneys are encouraged to understand the diversity of legal and business issues confronting their clients and assist in finding resources both legal and non-legal to speak to those needs. The program is housed in the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery.  Experienced business law and corporate attorneys provide guidance and supervision. Credits: 3 to 5(fall and spring) and 7(summer). Permission of the instructor required.  For more information see UWLE.ORG


Introduction

The Law & Entrepreneurship Clinic (L&E Clinic) has three goals. Two of those goals are attuned with student learning outcomes and are set forth below with corresponding competencies under each along with a method for measurement. The third goal is for our work to have an economic impact. While that goal does not lend itself to student learning outcomes, it remains an important goal of the L&E Clinic and regularly guides and influences our strategy.

Learning Outcomes

Goal #1: To provide a challenging experiential learning opportunity that provides students with the opportunity to develop critical thinking and practical research, drafting and client management skills.

Student will demonstrate the following competencies:

• Critical thinking and judgment
o Legal analysis and reasoning
o Pragmatic problem solving
o Strategic thinking and judgment

• Service Orientation with Clients
o Responsiveness to client
o Good client rapport and relationships
o Effective planning and organization of work

• Communication
o Effective oral communication
o Effective written communication
o Effective listening

• Practice Orientation
o Commitment to self-development, including seeking out new and different opportunities
o Proactive commitment to L&E Clinic practice requirements
o Follow through on use of L&E Clinic systems and processes
o Resilience, perseverance and self-awareness
o Effective teamwork

Metric: At the end of each semester, supervising attorneys will rate students on their ability in each of the above skill areas using the Core Competency Assessment Tool. Individual ratings will be used to provide students with personalized feedback. Aggregated ratings will be shared with the group as a whole and used by the staff to measure group outcomes in each of the skill areas. Class aggregate scores on the Core Competency Framework Assessment ski areas will be 3.5 out of 5 or above.

Goal #2: To provide quality work product for the client

Students will demonstrate the following skills when working with clients:

o Effective written communication skills
o Effective oral communication skills
o Expectations were set and met or exceeded
o Thoughtful and thorough issue analysis
o Produce documents and work product that meet their goals

Metric: At the end of each engagement, the responsible student sends a Close Out Letter to the client, This Letter includes a link to a survey seeking client feedback on the above skills. Where identifiable information is provided, results will be shared with individual students. Aggregated client responses will be shared with students as a group and used by staff to measure group outcomes in these skills areas. Class aggregate Client Exit Survey scores in each skill area will be 90% Satisfactory or higher.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Law Externship

Course Page for Spring 2018 - McBride, Erin

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Mediation Clinic

Course Page for Spring 2016 - Mayes, Perri

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Midwestern Environmental Advocates Externship

Course Page for Fall 2016 - Tai, Stephanie

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Neighborhood Law Clinic (NLC)

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Mitch,

More information about the Neighborhood Law Clinic is available here:

http://law.wisc.edu/eji/nlp/index.html

For further information or any questions about the program, please contact the Neighborhood Law Clinic faculty director, Mitch by email at mitch@wisc.edu

*Information about clinical credits (and other general clinical information) is available here:

http://law.wisc.edu/current/rtf/13.html

Q: Why are there are no grades listed under the Past Grade Distributions link?
A: Because the program is offered only as Pass/Fail.


Learning
Objectives:

1a. Students will be able to identify, understand, and apply substantive and procedural rental housing and employment laws.

2a. Students will be able to examine a set of facts, distinguish the various legal and non-legal issues, research them, and prioritize the issues in oral reports and written memos.

2b. Students will be able to predict (i.e. hypothesize and visualize) how the various options which clients could take might be handled by the client, and responded to by the opposing party.

2c. Students will be able to evaluate the various options, estimate the pros and cons, explain these, and recommend a course(s) of action that the could be taken.

3a. Students will be able to develop and refine their own personal definition of what it means to be a professional incorporating the rules of professional conduct and their personal values.

4a. Students will be able to competently and ethically interview and counsel clients.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Neighborhood Law Project

Course Page for Spring 2013 - Mitch,

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

More information about the Neighborhood Law Project is available here:

http://law.wisc.edu/fjr/clinicals/nlp.html

For further information or any questions about the program, please contact the Neighborhood Law Project faculty director, Mitch by email at mitch@wisc.edu

*Information about clinical credits (and other general clinical information) is available here:

http://law.wisc.edu/current/rtf/13.html

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Neighborhood Law Project (NLP)

Course Page for Summer 2011 10-Week Session - Mitch,

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Neighborhood Law Project (NLP)/ Neighborhood Law Clinic (NLC)

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Mitch,

More information about the Neighborhood Law Project is available here:

http://law.wisc.edu/fjr/clinicals/nlp.html

For further information or any questions about the program, please contact the Neighborhood Law Project faculty director, Mitch by email at mitch@wisc.edu

*Information about clinical credits (and other general clinical information) is available here:

http://law.wisc.edu/current/rtf/13.html

Q: Why are there are no grades listed under the Past Grade Distributions link?
A: Because the program is offered only as Pass/Fail.

Oxford Federal Project

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Stevenson, Adam

Throughout the course of the clinic, students will:

1. Develop proficiency in investigation, issue spotting, legal research and written work, including legal documents and client correspondence
2. Learn to collaborate with clients, other students, and other criminal justice system actors
3. Develop an ability to identify ethical issues in everyday practice, and respond to such issues according to the rules of professional conduct and consistent with norms or professionalism.
4. Learn federal criminal procedure and sentencing
5. Develop an ability to manage a caseload and identify and achieve client goals.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Prosecution Project

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Glinberg, Lanny

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Re-Entry Project

Course Page for Spring 2015 -

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Re-Entry Project (formerly CSLAP)

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Streit, Kenneth

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Restorative Justice Project

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Scharrer, Jonathan

Learning Outcomes:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the differences between the traditional criminal justice model and restorative justice as well as the applications of restorative justice within and around the criminal justice system and communities.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of victim-offender dialogue facilitation using restorative justice principles. Demonstrate knowledge of the structural elements of this restorative justice process and how each element is applied in practice. Demonstrate the ability to use advanced facilitation and interviewing techniques related to victim-offender dialogues.
3. Demonstrate knowledge of the dynamics involved in the crimes being addressed and the behavioral characteristics and dynamics of offenders.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Thurgood Marshall Externship

Course Page for Summer 2011 10-Week Session - Greene, Linda

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

WI DOJ Externship

Course Page for Summer 2017 3-Week Session - Paulson, Rebecca

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

WI Department of Justice

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Paulson, Rebecca

Learning Objectives:
1. Develop practical and marketable experience in the day-to-day practice of law, from the administrative level through to the appellate level.
2. Hone research, writing, pleading, briefing, negotiating, trial and advocacy skills under the supervision of attorneys.
3. Develop advanced skills in all facets of administrative, trial, and appellate legal work, from problem solving, legal analysis, factual investigation, communication, and litigation strategy, to organization and management of legal work and public advocacy.
4. Further develop professional skills by developing habits of a reflective practitioner who understands how to learn from experience, exploring career interests and goals, and building professional networks.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

WI Department of Justice Externship

Course Page for Fall 2017 - Paulson, Rebecca

See section-specific descriptions for a discussion of the various clinical programs.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Wisconsin Innocence Project

Course Page for Spring 2018 - Sperling, Carrie , Wright, Steven

Learning Outcomes

Wisconsin Innocence Project students will be able to:

1. Develop proficiency in factual investigation, issue spotting, legal research and written work, including advocacy and client communication.
2. Take responsibility for identifying and achieving client goals.
3. Learn to collaborate with clients, other students, supervisors, and other actors in the criminal justice system.
4. Begin to engage in self-assessment and reflection about our clinical work, the role of the lawyer, and the criminal justice system.
5. Communicate effectively in writing through client letters, motions, and case memos
6. Develop and recognize common ethical issues and respond consistent with rules of professional responsibility and individual profession identity.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor